MUI: Ahok statement is a blasphemy and has legal consequences

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RR Laeny Sulistyawati, Ratna Ajeng Tejomukti

JAKARTA

Governor Basuki Tjahaja (Ahok)’s statement about Alquran surah Al Maidah verse 51 has caused unrest among the people, therefore the Indonesian Council of Ulama (MUI) reviewed the case and gave its religious statement on Tuesday. “Ahok has insulted the Holy Quran and/or the clerics. His statement has a legal consequences,” Chairman (MUI) Ma’ruf Amin said.

Ma’ruf explained Alquran surah Al Maidah verse 51 explicitly contains a prohibition for Muslims to make the Jewish and Christian as leader. “This verse as the proposition prohibition non-Muslims as a leader,’’ he said.

MUI stated Islamic clerics are obliged to convey the contents of surah Al Maidah verse 51 in order to remind every Muslim to vote for Muslim as leader. At this point, MUI statement has broken Ahok’s opinion about the verse.

Ahok believed clerics or Muslim in general who cited Al Maidah verse 51 were manipulating and politicizing the verse for political gain. “Ahok has insulted the clerics and Muslims by saying Muslims are manipulated by the verse or who ever citing the verse,” Ma’ruf said.

Also read: Jakarta Governor apologizes for offending Muslims

Further more, MUI said every Muslim should believe the truth and accuracy of surah Al-Maidah verse 51 as a guidance in choosing a leader. “It is haram to say Al Maidah verse 51 as a false guidance and it is a religious blasphemy of the Quran,” Ma’ruf underlined.

MUI said the government and the people are obligated to keep the harmony in religious life, in the society, in the state and in the nation. The government also has the obligation to prevent religious blasphemy by not neglecting the case. “We are asking the people to remain calm, not to vigilante, and let the authority handle the case. Of course, we should keep an eye in blasphemy activities and report it to the authority,” Ma’ruf said.

MUI urged the authority to act proactive and firm in religious blasphemy case. “Who ever did religious blasphemy over the Quran and the Islamic teachings or insulting the clerics and Muslims should be dealt firmly,” Ma’ruf said.

Also read: Muslim condems Jakarta Governor for religious blasphemy

In order to keep public trust in law enforcement, the case should be processed quickly and proportionally in a professional manner. “The authority should consider the sense of justice for the people,” Ma’ruf said.

Republika,

Wednesday, 12 October 2016

ahok-mui-rubrik-mui-bantah-kena-intervensi-keluarkan-keputusan-soal-ahok-14209-l

http://www.republika.co.id/berita/en/islam-in-archipelago/16/10/12/oew994414-mui-ahok-statement-is-a-blasphemy-and-has-legal-consequences

 

Madura ulamas write to president over Ahok’s alleged blasphemy case

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Antara

PAMEKASAN, MADURA ISLAND

LEADERS of Islamic boarding schools have written to President Joko Widodo, urging that the due process of law should follow in the alleged case of blasphemy involving Jakarta Governor Basuki Tjahaja Purnama (Ahok).

The letter was written by leaders of these schools across Madura Island in East Java Province. “We sent a letter to Indonesian President Joko Widodo today,” chief of All-Madura Islamic Boarding Schools Association (HP3M) KH Lailurrahman said in a press briefing at Pamekasan Police Precinct here on Friday.

The letter, dated October 26, 2016, was signed by HP3M Chief KH Lailurrahman and his secretary KH Djakfar Shodik. The ulamas said if the legal process in this case was not followed, it will trigger larger rallies against Ahok, the Jakarta governor who is seeking re-election in February 2017.

In the letter, the ulamas also mentioned several articles in the 1945 Constitution that could form the legal basis for their call, including article 1 para 2; article 1 para 3; article 4 para 1; article 24 para 1; article 27 para 1; and article 30 para 4. “Article 4 para 1 of the Constitution stipulates that the President of the Republic of Indonesia holds government power in accordance with the law,” he noted.

Article 30 para 4 stipulates that the Indonesian police is a state apparatus assigned to keep security and public order, protect and serve the public and uphold the law, he underlined. He lamented that it seemed the police had not bothered about the case despite widespread protests against the Jakarta governor.

The Indonesian Council of Ulama (MUI) said Ahok has committed blasphemy citing a Al Maidah verse 51. Ahok told people in the Seribu Islands not to be deceived by people using the verse asking them not to elect a non-Muslim leader in the forthcoming election.

Also read: MUI: Ahok’s statement is a blasphemy and has legal consequences

MUI chairman Ma’ruf Amin pointed out in a statement that Ahok has insulted the Quran and the ulamas, and that police should investigate the case.

Republika

Saturday, 29 October 2016

ahok-ulama-aliansi-ulama-madura

http://www.republika.co.id/berita/en/islam-in-archipelago/16/10/29/ofrp5u414-madura-ulamas-write-to-president-over-ahoks-alleged-blasphemy-case

 

Muslim Groups Protest Jakarta’s Governor over Blasphemy of Al-Quran

ahok-demo

JAKARTA

SOME 15,000 Muslims from various community organizations, Friday (10/14/2016), hit tables in the City Hall Jalan Medan Merdeka Selatan, Central Jakarta, to protest outside the Governor Basuki “Ahok” Tjahaja Purnama alleged to have degrading Al Qur’an and scholars.

Massa arrived at about 14:00 pm after a previous protest outside the building to urge the Police Criminal Ahok soon turned into a suspect for the offense.

The majority of the mass arrival wearing white costume that makes Jalan Medan Merdeka Selatan whitened, while traffic was diverted because all the roads filled with humans.

What is unique, in order to cool the atmosphere and prevent anarchy, the police play a song of praise nuances of Islam when mass among others, are members of the FPI and FBR arrived.

The song playing is songs Asmaul Husna (99 names of Allah) that are downloaded from YouTube and play them through a smart phone that is connected to the car speakers.

“It is already prepared. We do this in order to calm protesters, “said Ronald Arita, Polda Metro Jaya Sabhara members were involved in securing course of action.

But the police action was apparently not very effective, because once the masses arrive, they immediately shouted: “Catch! Catch! Catch the Ahok! “

Muslims are very angry because during the policy Ahok former regent of East Belitung it to the Muslims tend to be discriminatory and oppressive.

Ahok prohibit Muslims from doing Tabligh Akbar in Monas, prohibits the sale of sacrificial animals on the roadside and prohibit slaughter of sacrificial animals in schools and public places.

The peak moment in the dialogue with the citizens of the Thousand Islands on 27 September 2016, Ahok said he does not matter if it is not selected again in Pilgub Jakarta in 2017, warned that linked the plea that Muslims do not elect a leader who is not a believer, citizens have been deceived by Surah Al Maidah paragraph 51.

MUI rate, with what it says it, as if to say that the contents Ahok verse 51 Surah Al Maidah incorrect and scholars who convey that paragraph to the people has been expressed things that are not true anyway, so Ahok considered to have been an insult to the Qur’an and scholars. (Man)

CitraIndonesia.com

Friday, 14 October 2016

 

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Insulting, 15.000 Muslims Demo Governor Jakarta Ahok

M’sian cartoonist gets ideas after Subuh (dawn) prayer

LatNur Firdaus Abdul Rahim
KUALA TERENGGANU, MALAYSIA

CARTOONIST Mohd Nor Khalid, or popularly known as Lat, regards Ramadhan not only as the most blessed month, but also the time of the year when he is able to get ideas and inspiration for his work.

Born on March 5, 1951, in Kota Bharu, Perak, Lat, who is known for his cartoon series the ‘Kampung Boy’, said the best time for him to focus on his cartoon work is after the subuh (morning) prayer.

“I can be said to have retired, as my work no longer appeared in the newspapers, but I do still draw just to pass the time and is working to produce a comic book soon.

“So, the best time for me to get ideas for my work is in the morning, when my mind is still fresh.

“During the fasting month, after the ‘sahur’ (pre-dawn meal) and Subuh prayer as well as doing other religious rituals, I’ll spend time until noon on my cartoon work. That’s the time when I can focus,” he told Bernama.

He was met during an event “Jelajah Potret Penerima Anugerah Merdeka” by Petronas Gallery at the State Museum here recently. Lat is one of the recipients of the award. He received it in 2014.

On how he got himself into becoming a cartoonist, Lat said he had the skill since young and his father was the first person to discover his talent. He said most of his work was influenced by local cartoonists at that time like Raja Hamzah, Alias Kulub, Raja Sulaiman and Saidin Yahya.

“My father was the one who actually encouraged me. I remember during my childhood days, he would take us to the circus and when we got home, asked me to draw the animals which performed at the circus.

“That was how my interest in drawing started and it then progressed into drawing cartoons,” he added. The winner of the 2002 Fukuoka Asian Culture Award has so far published more than 20 cartoon series.

The first when he was 13 years of age. Most of his work depicts the life of the multi-racial society in Malaysia. Referring to “Kampung Boy”, he said it was based on his personal observation, life and experience.

“I don’t know how to create political stories because it is not an element that can last in the cartoon world.

“I prefer elements that are more remembered by the people, like friendship, neighbours and living in a society,” he added. He said the role of a cartoonist was not merely to produce work for people to view.

“At the same time, a cartoonist should be an agent to unite the people, especially in a country with various races, only then there is harmony,” he added.

Bernama

Sunday, July 10, 2016

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– See more at: http://www.bt.com.bn/features/2016/07/10/m%E2%80%99sian-cartoonist-gets-ideas-after-dawn#sthash.BTSk9Hih.dpuf

‘The Straits Times’ says: Mosque’s outreach a shining example

MASJID SPORE

SINGAPORE

THE one-year-old Al-Islah Mosque in Punggol, which has already built close ties with neighbouring institutions and residents, embodies ways in which places of worship can help create a more resilient society in these trying times. While the primary purpose of a religious institution is to serve followers, reaching out to the wider community shows the value it places on face-to-face relations. Al-Islah demonstrates this by partnering nearby schools to distribute food to poor families in the neighbourhood. It also opens its doors to others for free guided tours of its premises. Steps like these help to dispel misconceptions of what mainstream Islam stands for. This is especially important given the way some extremist organisations have taken the religion’s name in vain to cloak their dastardly attacks in a semblance of piety.

The Islamic Religious Council of Singapore notes that the mosque stands as “an important bulwark of Muslim identity and community integrity” in Singapore, where Muslims constitute a minority living in a society undergoing far-reaching changes. Community-friendly initiatives that benefit both Muslims and non-Muslims, such as blood donation drives and assistance to low-income families, help to integrate mosques into the wider life of the nation.

MASJID ALISLAH

Masjid Al-Islah, Kampong Punjol, Singapore

Mosques are not just the focus of religious activities – although that is an essential function – but must act as centres of social development, too. It is in that spirit that they embrace their social calling in a secular state. Muslims, like followers of other religions in Singapore, are reassured that their religious obligations are respected. Simultaneously, they must acknowledge that no community of believers exists in a vacuum, but as part of a larger whole.

This is where Singapore’s model of religious harmony differs from practices in countries that dichotomise religion and public life to the extent that one becomes an affront to the other. Here, religion is accepted as a legitimate influence on social outcomes so long as no faith claims the right to influence these exclusively. Overlapping spheres of belief are anchored in a national centre. A national consensus has emerged on this policy, which treats all religious communities equally. It will be tested from time to time. Insistent foreign influences, travelling via the Internet, do and will make their way into Singapore. Having no stake in Singapore’s common religious and racial future, these groups have no qualms in dividing people. So that they do not lead impressionable minds astray, it is essential for Singapore to curb such influences with its local resources.

In their very co-existence, mosques and other places of worship show that Singaporeans are capable of not just living with religious diversity but also of thriving on it.

The Straits Times
Wednesday, 6 July 2016

MASJID AL-ISLAH

Muslims performing prayer and reading al-Quran at Masjid Al-islah in Kampung Punjol, Singapore.

http://www.straitstimes.com/singapore/mosques-outreach-a-shining-example

‘Mobile mosque’ makes praying easier in gridlocked Jakarta

mobile-mosque

Kiki Siregar
JAKARTA

AS THE call to prayer rang out across the Indonesian capital, Sutikno faced a dilemma — the devout Muslim needed to set off through Jakarta’s notorious traffic to pick up his wife but did not want to miss out on worshipping.

However, for him and others juggling the demands of hectic, 21st century life and piety in the crowded capital of the world’s most populous Muslim-majority country, a solution has just pulled up.

The “mosque-mobile” started cruising through Jakarta in June as the Islamic holy month of Ramadhan drew to a close, aiming to ensure Muslims did not miss out on prayers by setting up in busy places, such as near festivals and sports events.

Sutikno, a middle-aged office worker who like many Indonesians goes by one name, came across the van parked between a sports stadium and shopping malls, and it proved a godsend.

“I was supposed to go to a mosque that is quite far away but then I saw this one,” he told AFP.

“I just parked my car and performed my prayers here. I can save time and go and pick up my wife faster.”

The green and white van has been specially adapted to become a mobile place of worship. At prayer time, the sides of the vehicle open up and a small stage is extended, from which the imam preaches.

Prayer rugs are rolled out in front of the van, with space for up to 100 people, and a handful can worship inside the vehicle. It also provides special robes for women and a tank of water for the faithful to ritually cleanse themselves before praying.

The mosque started operating in Jakarta with a team of four in the final week of Ramadhan, a month of fasting and piety, but plans to continue afterwards.

The van offers its services between 3pm and 7pm for two prayer sessions, at a time traffic is bad as millions flood out of downtown areas and head back to satellite cities. Muslims are supposed to pray five times a day.

During Ramadhan, the crew running the Jakarta “mosque-mobile” also serve snacks to people stuck in gridlock when it is time to break their fast.

The van is run by the Archipelago Mosque Foundation, an organisation that sets up and maintains mosques, with funding provided by Adira Sharia, a group that provides Islamic-compliant financing for motor vehicles.

“We were concerned that there was a lack of places of worship at crowded spots such as music concerts, festivals and football games. Sometimes people intend to pray, but because there are no facilities, they skip it,” said Hamzah Fatdri, director of the mosque foundation.

The Jakarta mosque-on-wheels has hit the streets after the foundation launched a mobile place of worship in the city of Bandung, southeast of the capital on the main island of Java.

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The Bandung mosque proved a success, offering prayer sessions at 50 different locations in its first year of operation, and the foundation hopes the van in the capital — which is slightly larger than the Bandung model — can do even better.

Indonesia is already home to some 800,000 mosques, including a large number in Jakarta and other major cities.

But with many people stuck in gridlock at prayer time — particularly during Ramadhan — and ad hoc festivals and sports events typically failing to provide facilities for praying, the foundation believes the “mobile-mosque” will be a great help.

It is the latest innovation to offer relief to residents of Indonesia’s booming but overcrowded, traffic-choked cities, where hundreds of new vehicles are hitting the roads every day as the middle class rapidly expands due to strong economic growth.

Motorbike taxi-hailing apps that whisk passengers quickly through the gridlock have been a chief beneficiary, and have expanded their businesses into other areas such as food delivery and courier services.

Still, some worshippers were not immediately taken by the mosque-on-wheels.

“Maybe because this was a new experience, I felt a bit awkward and embarrassed to pray in an open, public space,” student Mahtashal Harbi said after worshipping for the first time at the Jakarta van.

AFP
Tuesday, July 6, 2016

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http://www.bt.com.bn/features/2016/07/06/%E2%80%98mobile-mosque%E2%80%99-makes-praying-easier-gridlocked-jakarta#sthash.osvoVcLZ.dpuf

Pasar Ikan residents spend Ramadhan amid ruins

Ahok PsrIkan

Forbearing: Evictees of Pasar Ikan perform tarawih, the evening Ramadhan prayer, at a temporary shelter set up next to a half-demolished Mushola (prayer room) in the recently cleared Pasar Ikan in Penjaringan, North Jakarta.(JP/FAC)(prayer room) in the recently cleared Pasar Ikan in Penjaringan, North Jakarta.(JP/FAC)

JAKARTA

SOME children chased mice and cats over the rubble of their former homes while waiting for their parents to finish tarawih, evening Ramadhan prayers, inside a tent and a half-demolished mushola (prayer room) in recently cleared Pasar Ikan in Penjaringan, North Jakarta.

Having to perform prayers on the ruins and enduring a cold night wind were the last things they hoped for this year’s Ramadhan.

Since the Jakarta administration razed their houses in April, around a hundred residents have refused to give up their land, camped inside seven temporary shelters set up amid the ruins.

They have refused to be relocated to low-cost rental apartments, given that they have lived in the area for decades and worked in the nearby fish market.

“This year’s Ramadhan has been emotionally draining,” said 40-year-old Maesaroh. “We are not only being tested by abstaining from food and drink, but our emotions are also being put to test.”

Having been accused of occupying the land illegally by the administration, Maesaroh said that she would continue to struggle for what she claimed to be her rightful land because then Jakarta governor, Joko “Jokowi” Widodo, had promised to formalize ownership of land that had been inhabited for more than 20 years.

“I have the necessary documents such as PBB [land and building tax receipts] and land acquisition certificate signed by a sub district head,” Maesaroh said.

According to one of the residents, Upi Yunita, she had tried to take care of her land certificate in 2014 but officials at the National Land Agency only said that they could not help her since the land where her house was built had been declared state land. “When I asked them for proof of their claim, they could not show me anything,” she said.

The eviction, which is part of the Jakarta administration’s plan to pave the way for the revitalization of tourism on the city’s northern coast as well as for flood mitigation purposes, affected 347 households.

The residents, however, believe the move was unjust because they had never been involved in any decision-making discussion.

“Ahok is very mean to let us live like this. We helped him win the 2012 election, although most of us cast our votes because of Pak Jokowi, not him,” she continued.

Recalling the old days, she said that many things had changed since last year’s Ramadhan. She said that she used to gather with her family to enjoy the pre-dawn-meal and in the dusk when they broke their fast. Now she had to live separately from her family because her home no longer existed.

“My husband now stays in his office’s dormitory,” she said. “I’ve decided to stay here with other people who share a similar fate.”

Another resident Said, 56, said that the situation was entirely different compared to the last Ramadhan, when a large number of residents performed mass tarawih prayers.

“Afterward, I used to socialize with my neighbors and discuss many things until midnight. I just can’t believe that things have changed so fast,” he said.

He, however, said that he felt touched by the sense of togetherness that developed in the situation. “Just like a big family, we share everything we have. There seems to be no constraints between us,” he said.

The situation has also attracted sympathy from students. Fifty college students grouped under an alliance of engineering students from universities across Jakarta held a breaking of the fast event on Saturday together with the residents and presented 200 boxed meals.

“We feel called. One of our members lives near this area,” said Gabby Latupirisa, a student of Indonesian Christian University (UKI) in Cawang, East Jakarta. (fac)

The Jakarta Post
Saturday, 25 June 2016

ahok gusur

http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2016/06/25/pasar-ikan-residents-spend-ramadhan-amid-ruins.html